Morphine Addiction: Signs, Symptoms, & Treatment

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FAQs

Morphine is a potent opioid used to treat pain. It is commonly administered following surgical procedures or during labor and childbirth.  Many people who are prescribed this medication wonder, “Can you get addicted to morphine?

How Addictive Is Morphine?

As a Schedule II controlled substance, it is possible to become addicted to morphine, even when the drug is used as directed. Rapid development of tolerance means that people using morphine require higher doses to deliver the desired effects. Tolerance often leads to dependence, a state characterized by the presentation of withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation. The challenging nature of morphine withdrawal symptoms can create barriers to cessation, increasing the risk of addiction. Morphine addiction is clinically described as opioid use disorder, a chronic and relapsing brain condition.

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Signs of Morphine Addiction

Look out for the following signs of morphine addiction:

  • Isolation and withdrawal: Some people may withdraw from social activities and isolate themselves from friends and family as a result of opioid use.
  • Neglect of responsibilities: Neglecting important responsibilities at work, school, or home may become noticeable.
  • Physical changes: Observable physical changes, such as changes in appearance or hygiene, may indicate a problem with opioids like morphine.
  • Financial issues: Unexplained financial difficulties or constant requests for money may be indicative of substance misuse.
  • Frequent cravings: Expressing persistent cravings for morphine may suggest a growing dependence.
  • Secrecy and deception: Watch for individuals engaging in secretive behaviors or deception to hide morphine use from others.
  • Decline in performance: A noticeable decline in academic or work performance may become evident.
  • Risk-taking behaviors: Engaging in risky activities while under the influence of morphine, indicating impaired judgment.
  • Health issues: The emergence of unexplained health problems or worsening existing conditions may be linked to morphine use.
  • Inability to cut down use: Struggling to cut down or control morphine use despite repeated attempts.
  • Continued use despite adverse outcomes: Persisting in morphine use even when it leads to social, interpersonal, or health-related problems.
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Morphine Addiction Symptoms

DSM-5-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) outlines the following diagnostic criteria for morphine addiction (opioid use disorder):

  1. Using more morphine than intended or using the opioid for longer than planned.
  2. Making repeated unsuccessful attempts to moderate or discontinue use of morphine.
  3. Spending lots of time using morphine or recovering from its effects.
  4. Experiencing powerful cravings for morphine.
  5. Ongoing use of opioids even though it is preventing you from fulfilling personal and professional commitments.
  6. Continuing use of morphine even though it’s causing or triggering problems in your closest relationships.
  7. Spending less time on favored activities because of morphine use.
  8. Frequently using opioids in potentially dangerous situations, such as before driving.
  9. Using morphine even though it’s causing or worsening a physical or psychological health condition.
  10. Tolerance develops so that more morphine is required to deliver the initial effects.
  11. Withdrawal symptoms presenting in the absence of morphine.

If you or someone you know exhibits these indicators, seek professional help and support.

Treatment for Morphine Addiction

Addressing morphine addiction requires a comprehensive and individualized approach to support recovery and long-term well-being. Treatment plans typically incorporate a combination of medical interventions, behavioral therapy, and support services.

Medical detoxification

The first step in treating morphine addiction often involves medical detoxification. This process is conducted under medical supervision to manage withdrawal symptoms safely. MAT involves the use of medications to aid in recovery by reducing cravings and minimizing the risk of relapse. Common medications for opioid addiction include methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. These medications are used in conjunction with counseling and therapy.

Behavioral therapy

Various forms of behavioral therapy are integral to morphine addiction treatment. CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) helps people identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors associated with substance use. Contingency management provides positive reinforcement for abstinence, while motivational enhancement therapy enhances a person’s motivation to remain drug-free.

Individual and group counseling

Individual counseling sessions provide a private and safe space for people to explore personal challenges, triggers, and coping mechanisms. Group counseling engenders a sense of community and allows participants to share experiences, receive support, and learn from one another.

Family therapy

Involving family members in the treatment process can be highly beneficial for all parties. Family therapy helps repair relationships damaged by addiction, educates family members about the recovery process, and provides a supportive environment for both the person in recovery and their loved ones.

Support groups

Participating in support groups, such as NA (Narcotics Anonymous) or SMART Recovery, offers ongoing support from people who have experienced similar challenges. Peer support can be instrumental in maintaining long-term recovery.

Holistic approaches

Holistic therapies like yoga, mindfulness meditation, and art therapy can complement traditional evidence-based treatment methods. These approaches address the overall well-being of the individual, promoting physical, mental, and emotional health.

Aftercare planning

Planning for ongoing care can help prevent relapse. Aftercare may include continued therapy, support group participation, and regular check-ins with healthcare providers. Developing a robust aftercare plan enhances the person’s ability to navigate the challenges of daily life without resorting to substance use.

Reintegration into daily life

Successful treatment involves helping people reintegrate into their daily lives. This may include support in finding employment, mending relationships, and establishing a healthy routine.

Continued monitoring and assessment

Long-term recovery requires ongoing monitoring and assessment. Regular check-ins with healthcare professionals can identify potential challenges early on and adjust the treatment plan accordingly. Treatment for morphine addiction is a dynamic and ongoing process, tailored to meet the unique needs of each individual. Seeking professional help is essential for a successful recovery journey. If you or someone you know is struggling with morphine addiction, reaching out to a healthcare provider or addiction specialist is the first step toward healing. Here’s how you can get started.

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Get Treatment for Morphine Addiction at California Detox

Now you know how long morphine lasts and how addictive this substance can be, you might be ready to engage with treatment. If so, we can help you with this at California Detox in Laguna Beach, CA.

Begin your opioid addiction recovery with supervised detoxification at our beachside facility. Medications reduce the intensity of withdrawal symptoms, while continuous clinical care mitigates complications and relapse during early recovery.

During ongoing inpatient treatment, you can address the psychological and emotional side of opioid addiction through medication-assisted treatment, psychotherapies, counseling, and holistic therapies. All California Detox programs also include comprehensive aftercare. Call 949.694.8305 today and start your recovery from morphine addiction right away.

FAQs

As a Schedule II controlled substance, it is possible to become addicted to morphine, even when the drug is used as directed. Rapid development of tolerance means that people using morphine require higher doses to deliver the desired effects. Tolerance often leads to dependence, a state characterized by the presentation of withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation.
Addressing morphine addiction requires a comprehensive and individualized approach to support recovery and long-term well-being. Treatment plans typically incorporate a combination of medical interventions, behavioral therapy, and support services.

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